Finding Your Passion

People want to have a life that gives them a sense of personal satisfaction.

For Those  who don’t made the Myer Briggs Test i attached you an article  to examining each personality type and job fit.

 

 

 

Rationals may have a problem with the Boomer phrase, “Finding Your Passion.” Many Rationals are suspicious of strong emotion. For them, life satisfaction equates to having Knowledge and Competence.

Many of our early Presidents were Rationals, such as John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe. A common characteristic is a vision of the future and the ability to make that vision come true.

Of all the Rationals, the most driven toward a leadership position is the . David Keirsey said they cannot NOT lead. In business Fieldmarshals (ENTJ) are often found as top executives and senior managers as well as heads of sales and marketing. Since they are driven toward reaching goals, they can be project managers, investment brokers, financial planners, labor relations leaders. Their analytic abilities are of advantage in positions such as business consulting, management consulting, stockbroker, and economic analyst. Professional fields attract the Fieldmarshal so they can call their own shots. If they enter the legal field, they may rise to the position of judge. Says Kent, “I’m very goal driven and I expect everyone who works for me to be aiming toward the same goal. If you focus your team, you can achieve what might once have seemed impossible.”

The Mastermind (INTJ) is very focused as well, but more on an internal vision. They are good at solving problems and like to work on tough intellectual puzzles. They are often led into technical positions such as scientific researcher, design engineer, environmental planner. The developing field of genetics benefits from their intensity as does the field of medicine. In education they are most often found at the college and university level. In the professions, they may be a lawyer, a business analyst, or strategic planner. Some have a strong artistic/creative bent and may become an artist, inventor, or designer. Whatever they do, they do it with intensity. Says Kim, “I am constantly teaching myself something new in order to solve the problems that I encounter. My husband leaves me alone when he sees that I am caught in what he calls my “Thinking Time.” I’m unwinding knots even in my sleep.”

Usually the most out-going of all the Rationals is the Inventor (ENTP). That’s because they love bouncing their ideas off other people and seeing their reactions. It is not unusual to find this type in any job that requires new ideas and people contact. You might find them in politics, in real estate development, in advertising, in marketing, or in public relations. They could be a venture capitalist, a management consult, or a sports agent. As long as they have the opportunity to invent a new product or a new experience, they will shine. Says Donna, “We’d never tried landing on Mars using air bags and bouncing, but we did it. We took the risk, then checked out everything we could to limit the risk and we succeeded.”

The most reserved of the Rationals is the Architect (INTP). They store huge amounts of information in their heads and can analyze problems with great insight. They are often drawn to professions where they can be their own bosses, such as optometrist, plastic surgeon, neurologist, or scientist. They may become lawyers, architects, or financial analysts. Many are found in the higher levels of academia in such fields as archeology, chemistry, philosophy, or mathematics. They may show a strong creative bent as a musician, inventor, or photographer. Some restore antiques or old cars. Says Don, “I like having my own business as an optometrist. I am constantly reading about new advances in the field. My work must be of the highest quality. My reputation has caused many patients to come to me because they have problems that were not solved by other treatment professionals.”

The drive towards constantly increasing their knowledge base and being highly competent is what gives Rationals a sense of personal satisfaction.

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